Categories Anthropology I

I.8 Methods of Sample taking

To draw valid conclusions , it needs careful selection of a sample that is representative of the group as a whole. Every study and research requires sample and it can be selected in different ways. I. Probability sampling involves random selection, allowing  to make statistical inferences about the whole group. There are four main types […]

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Categories Anthropology I

I.9.8 Non-infectious diseases.

Non-infectious diseases Noninfectious diseases include all diseases that are not caused by pathogens. Instead, noninfectious diseases are generally caused by genetic or environmental factors other than pathogens, such as toxic environmental exposures or unhealthy lifestyle choices. Most non-infectious diseases have a complex, multifactorial set of causes, often including a mix of genetic and environmental variables. […]

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Categories Anthropology I

I.9.6 Age, sex and population variation as genetic marker- HP

In man, both proteins (present in serum portion of the blood) and enzymes (present within the red blood cells/erythrocytes) have been screened for polymorphisms. Generally, the discovery of polymorphisms of serum protein preceded that of red cell enzymes in man. The first to be discovered was haptoglobin (HP) reported by Smithies , followed by Transferrin […]

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Categories Anthropology I

I.9.6 Age, sex and population variation as genetic marker- Transferrin System

In man, both proteins (present in serum portion of the blood) and enzymes (present within the red blood cells/erythrocytes) have been screened for polymorphisms. The first to be discovered was haptoglobin (HP) reported by Smithies (1955), followed by Transferrin (TF) (Poulik and Smithies, 1958), group specific component (GC) (Hirschfeld, 1959), complement component 3 (C3) (Wieme […]

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Categories Anthropology I

I. 9.2 Mendelian genetics in man-family study, single factor, multifactor, lethal, sub-lethal and polygenic inheritance in man- 2.

Monogenetic disorder It is caused by changes or mutations that occur in the DNA sequence of a single gene, also called Mendelian disorder. There are more than 6,000 known single- gene disorders, which occur in about 1 out of every 200 births. Some examples of monogenetic disorders include: Cystic Fibrosis, Sickle Cell Anaemia, Marfan syndrome, […]

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